It's that Challenging Time of the Semester

 

I recently read an interesting article that prompted me to address what the author wrote about.  Dr. Donald A. Saucier, a professor at Kansas University, put a voice to something I know I experience, and I am sure many of you do as well.  We are all hitting that challenging time...

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The Flipped Classroom - What you should know.

Two high school teachers introduced the flipped classroom approach in 2007.  They started recording and posting their lectures online to accommodate students who missed class.  This evolved into the flipped classroom approach, where what is usually done in class is now done outside of...

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Introverts as learners: They are more common than you think!

I can't tell you how often I have said to students; they need to be in a study group. I suspect you have too.

I recently read an interesting New York Times Bestseller book by Susan Cain titled "Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can't Stop Talking." The focus of this book was to...

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To record or not to record: The ongoing debate

It seems to me these days that many of us are still finding our way back to fully in-person teaching.  The pandemic has forever changed what we do in education, both for the positive and the negative.  The issue that seems to be generating quite a bit of angst across faculty in higher...

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ChatGPT. A must read!

AI (artificial intelligence).  We all (sort of) knew it was coming.  Well, it has arrived and created quite a stir within education.  If you haven’t heard about ChatGPT, you need to explore it and perhaps have discussions at the program and institutional level about what this...

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Work-Life Balance

As another year comes to a close, it seems like a good time to revisit the concept that we hear about so much: work-life balance.  Many of you were likely drawn to your position in education because of the promise of or perceived notion that working in education would provide the work-life...

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One Curriculum, One Faculty

One aspect I frequently encounter in PA programs is a divide between the didactic and clinical phases of the program.  This divide includes faculty members, as most programs designate faculty as either didactic or clinical phase based.  The reality is PA programs have only one...

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Grading Attendance and Participation – A good thing?

When I am reviewing a program’s syllabi, I often notice that part of the grading for the course includes attendance and/or participation.  It is important to note that neither of these is truly an assessment.  Attendance does not evaluate a student’s knowledge or skills....

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Are requiring GREs helping or hurting our admissions?

Many PA programs require the GRE as part of the admission requirements.  Recently, I entered into a conversation with a member of leadership that challenged the value of requiring a GRE.  So I went to the literature to better educate myself.  What I learned may be helpful to you.

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Who does more of the work in your class – you or your students?

I recently found an interesting article by Jeremy A. Rentz as part of The Best of 2021Teaching Professor Conference. He asked the simple question, who does more work during class time, you or the students? Think it about for a moment. Over a semester course, who is doing more work? I would bet...

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